LOOKING FOR AUDITIONS?
  • Get cast in films, theater productions, TV shows, commercials, and web series
  • Jobs for actors, models, dancers, comedians & more
  • Take your career to the next level; the most trusted audition resources in the world
CASTING A PRODUCTION?
  • Find amazing talent
  • Call for cast & crew
  • Reach thousands of actors, models & performers
  • Find location space and professional equipment
WANT TO GROW YOUR AUDIENCE?
  • List yourself, find industry professionals, skills and equipment
  • One stop Preview, Pre-screen and Review audience for your production
  • License your movie, music and products
  • Reach a global audience and maximize profit
PRESENTING
  • 12 Steps to Consistently Brilliant Performances, Part 3

    Concluding from last two weeks’ Part 1 & Part 2:
    Step 8: Create the Environment and Place Everyone and EverythingWhen you’re on set, you won’t need to do this step because you will be told or know or see where everyone and everything is, but for an audition, you need to intentionally place everyone and everything you’ll need for the scene.
    Let’s choose your average police interrogation scene as an example. Let’s say that in the scene, you are being interrogated by two officers, there is a file folder on the table in front of you with all the evidence, and there’s a two-way mirror behind which others are presumably observing your interrogation.
    You need to split your points of focus for each of the officers, choosing where they are, as well as the folder and mirror. You might choose to place the mirror directly to your left at the wall and the point of focus for the folder of evidence at the knees of the reader.
    As for the officers, the general rule of thumb is to make the reader whoever you have the most dialogue with. From there, for each other person you see or interact with in the scene, pick a separate point of focus, ideally fanning out from the camera as the center






    Go to Source

    Leave a Reply

    « | »